Adolph Biden

August 2, 2022

Adolph Biden
U.S. President
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington DC 20500

Dear Adolph Biden:

The setting used by you for your speech last evening and the message you preached closely resembled something I would have expected from Adolph Hitler in the days of Nazi Germany. How dare you.

You and your crooked family and comrades are the enemies of this country. I pray to God that the MAGA/America First movement will overtake you this November. It will unless you and the Democrat machine are successful at fraud as you were in November 2020.

You have no idea how angry Americans are at you and your ilk. You have no idea how angry Americans are at the FBI/DOJ raid of Mar-A-Largo….. and the lying claims made by you and Garland early on while Wray vacationed in the Adirondacks. The stench from the rot of Washington DC grows.

The last straw was the speech you made. In short, it was a rally cry for the MAGA/America First movement of which you are clearly terrified. It is coming.

Sincerely,

Kent H Blacklidge Ph.D.

Bye-Bye Liz

8-20-2022
Rep. Liz Cheney
416 Cannon HOB
Washington DC 20515

Dear Ms. Cheney:

As a lifelong Republican now 83 years old, I am delighted to be able to say to you, “Bye-Bye”.

You, your father, George Bush I & II were really traitors to our country. Oh, I have to add John McCain.

I hope you have a pleasant retirement in Wyoming where they have no use for you. The results of the primary should make that crystal clear.

Sincerely,

Kent H Blacklidge

November 2022 – Open Letter to SOS Indiana

8-20-2022

Secretary Holli Sullivan
Office of the Indiana Secretary of State
200 W Washington St
Room 201
Indianapolis IN 46204

Secretary Sullivan:

I write concerning the election to be held this November. Although Indiana is a strongly Republican state, I am convinced that significant fraud occurred in the 2020 election. It does not appear in Indiana that fraud was to the level results were affected, but I have not looked at all the down ballot races. My concern is that I think Indiana will continue to use electronic machines in the coming election that are vulnerable to fraud.

I believe it to be in the best interest of honest elections to take lessons from the past. Indiana did not have extended periods of early voting. It allowed absentee voting in real need cases. It required voters to vote in their home precinct. It required actual written signatures on poll books. It required voter identification. And the results were tabulated at the precinct level; then forwarded to central county offices.

The reason I know this is I was in management of The Kokomo Tribune for over 20 years. When Election Day came, the newsroom of the newspaper became “Election Central”. Candidates from both parties would gather in the newsroom to await results. Representatives of other media like local radio stations were set up in the newsroom. At the precinct level, two copies of results were generated. One copy was brought by courier to the newspaper office and the other taken to the Clerk’s office for totaling.

There were NO electronic machines used. The voting was either done on paper ballots or with mechanical machines. There was no chance fraud could be introduced. The elections were honest.

Fraud came with electronic machines. Signatures on little electronic signature pads are a joke. The transmission of results over the Internet is ripe for fraud. And even allowing voters to vote anywhere over even weeks is ripe for fraud. And for sure, mail in ballots are the worst.

I realize the General Assembly took some action to tighten elections, but until we return to paper ballots, voter id, home precinct voting, election one day voting except in genuine need cases for absentee ballots, signature verification, and precinct tally of votes; I believe we are asking for continuing fraud. It must stop.

The problem is nationwide.

Thanks for listening.

Sincerely,

Kent H Blacklidge Ph.D.

Fathers Day Past

June 19th was Fathers Day for 2022. This caused me to think of how I have been as a father and step-father and how very grateful I am to have had the father I did.

But first, I want to say something about my now perception of the relationship between my father and mother. Like most children growing up, I did not and could not accurately perceive the dynamics of the relationship between them. There was never any open conflict between them, but as an adult I both learned about and can see things were not all rosy all the time particularly during my brothers and my growing up years.

Like most families of the era, my father worked and my mother was expected to remain home and take care of the “home front”. What this meant was that I spent most of my home time with my mother and took on her views and attitudes. As I look back, I see there was some distance between my parents. My father always encouraged or even pushed for growth of his sons. My mother, on the other hand, tended to be fearful and overly protective of us which, frankly, was to our detriment. What she passed on was a world to be feared along with an expectation a husband’s role was as protector and provider — or even caterer. I believe there was always tension between my father and mother about how children should be raised. This had a lasting effect on me and both of my brothers.

The worst period for me as an “adult” began when I was only 19 years old. I had very difficult times as a result of a pre-marital pregnancy, then a wedding the day before turning age 20. I was a mess psychologically and physically. I wound up with a bleeding ulcer, panic attacks, depression, and high anxiety about all the time and for years. When still at Purdue as an undergraduate, I commonly went behind class buildings to throw up before going to class. This was my way of life.

For my last two years while at Purdue, I was seeing a psychiatrist at least weekly and sometimes twice a week. As I look back on that time now, he (the psychiatrist) is the one that focused me on my relationship with my father. I learned to blame him, my father, for about everything wrong in my life. I learned later that my youngest brother, too, was counseled elsewhere to blame our father. What a crime this was.

My father grew up without a father from age 16. His father was killed in a auto crash. His death sent my grandmother, his mother, into a period of deep depression. I honestly do not think she ever got completely out of that even to the day she died at age 78.

Some of my greatest and most treasured memories with my father began early in life. At age 11, I was the only one with him on the trip to Lake Maxinkuckee when the family (really my grandmother, but through him) purchased the lake home on East Shore Lane (The Knoll) from a elderly lady who had lived there for decades, Mrs. Rice. That lake home was so important in my life for so many years. Our family spent the summers there annually including my many summers of camp experience at Culver Military Academy beginning in 1949-50, then off for several years until my time in the Culver Horse Troop from 1954-56 and as an instructor of horsemanship in the summer of 1958. For years, my father would work during the week and come to the lake for 2-3 days on the weekends. He would take us boating and water skiing a lot. At times, I think we wore him out but he never complained.

I remember family trips to such places as Quebec, Canada, on a paddle wheeler on the St. Lawrence River. I had an experience at St. Anne-de-Beaupre Cathedral I will never forget. There were crutches and wheel chairs and canes lining the walls where people had been healed. My father took us there.

I remember several fishing trips to Canada and one to Colorado in the mountains. There were many. I remember trips to Florida around Hollywood where we would vacation a couple of weeks many winters right on the ocean beach.

I remember the days beginning in 1954 of skiing at Boyne Mountain, Michigan. My father would take he and me to Boyne about every winter weekend. It was just he and me. We would get there late on Friday evening, ski all of Saturday and Sunday, and he would drive us back to Kokomo late Sunday evening after the chair lift closed. I loved the time with him. At one point in that period when I was a senior in high school, my father took me, our mother, my two brothers, and a friend whose father had died to Alta, Utah; one of the nation’s premier skiing resorts. In all, we made two trips there.

And, of course, there was an earlier family trip to the Dude Ranch near Rim Rock, Arizona. My father was already in Arizona dealing with his alcohol issues that began in WWII. He was at a long time friend’s ranch to “dry out”. He was successful.

My mother, one brother, and I joined him by the Santa Fa Chief Pullman train there near Flagstaff. I vividly remember that trip because it was my earliest memory of being with horses. The Director of “Gone With the Wind”, Victor Flemming, was at the ranch. And I met Bruce Brockett, too. He was a rancher famous in the area. He gave my father a copy of “Fenced Trails”; a book written by him. My father treasured that book and I treasured it later after my father’s death.

There were not always fun trips to remember with my father. Like my maternal grandfather, I had serious allergy problems very young in life. My father is the one who took me to the best allergist in the country in Chicago. That was not a fun trip for me because the tests required multiple skin injections, but the ultimate result was that my allergies were managed and minimized the rest of my life. But for years I resented him for that trip that I regarded as torture. I regret that.

He was the one who, too, took me to a dentist in Indianapolis to have four teeth removed as part of preparation for teeth braces. I had a serious case of “buck teeth” at the time. Again, the result was a lifetime fix. The message: he was the one who acted to take even the unpleasant steps necessary for a better life for me. Another expression of love: yes.

After my undergraduate degree at Purdue, I joined the Kokomo Tribune family. My father guided me through all the newspaper departments to learn operations from the floor up. For some years, I was still a psychological mess. I know I was a disappointment to him during those darkest of days for me; but I did make it out of the worst. I played a key role in guiding the newspaper to being one of the very best in the world in both technology and content. Our subscribers trusted us for truth. We were awarded the “Best in the Nation” award several years running.

Eventually, I came to the deep realization my father did not deserve being blamed for anything. He loved me and my two brothers deeply. He did his best to guide us in life particularly as we grew up. I know being blamed must have deeply hurt him. I feel sorrow about that. He and I resolved all of that before his death. He developed heart issues — maybe from a broken heart — and for about a decade before the family sold the paper, he trusted me to guide the newspaper ship. I value that sacred trust he had in me.

When I think of me and being a father. I know that in spite of my deep and seemingly never ending psychological issues with my marriage relationship, I did my very best to be a loving father. I was the one who held children when sick. I was the one who laid down with them each night to read books and say prayers as they were preparing to sleep. I was the one who took them camping. I was the one who supported them in sports and hobbies. I was the one who helped with homework and more. My own father taught me about being a loving father.

Troubled times came early in my marriage to my children’s mother. Actually, it was from day one. I felt trapped, but crazy as it was, she and I went on to have a total of four children. I was in and out of counseling for most of the early years. At about 10 years of marriage, when the first of the children was about 10, I connected with a psychologist, Dr. Loriene Chase, in California.

I got myself to California in 1970 for about a two week stay. In hindsight, I absolutely don’t know how I made that trip. I was desperate. Most of the time I was alone but reading books she suggested and seeing her about one hour each week day. I remember staying in a small bungalow at the Miramar hotel near the beach in Santa Monica. I used to walk the beach every morning for a quiet time.

After a few hours with Dr. Chase, she was very clear with me that my marriage would not last and that I needed to leave the marriage as soon as I could. I did not heed her counsel and stayed about another ten years. I could not bring myself to leave four young children. I did what I believe to be my best in being a father for them from 1959. My marriage to their mother ended formally in 1979. That is not to say my then wife did not have issues as well. Indications are she had other relationships over the years.

Along the way, I met in 1975 the woman I knew was my spiritual other half. I felt safe, complete, and whole when with her. She had a daughter and I had four children. We both made our children the priority for several years. We were married in 1986. The sad part of the story is that my four children would not accept her as “family”. We know this was caused by their mother’s demands and attitudes. What my now wife and I always wanted was a blended family to include all. Did not happen. I finally walked away from my children, now adults — or they walked away from us — and then grandchildren. Conditions were not tolerable.

We do not know if there will ever be a time of coming together in our life times. We believe we have done our best to be loving parents and grandparents. We can only trust God for the future.

I loved being a father and grandfather to my children and my step-daughter and, when permitted, to our grandchildren. We deeply believe our grandchildren are paying a price they may never know about or how deep.

I wish all fathers a wonderful and blessed Fathers Day past and future.

Lost Friends/Neighbors

Just felt like I needed to write something about today. Our long time neighbors across the street from us departed for a new nest near Atlanta closer to one of their daughters and grandchildren. Jerry and Joyce have lived across from our home for over 17 years. Jerry was a high school classmate of mine and Joyce was a long time employee of the Kokomo Opalescent Glass Company when I was involved there for years.

The two of them always felt good. They were both warm, steady, Christian folks. They were part of the heart of our small neighborhood community. We now miss very much already that “heart”. There is a void that I do not believe will be filled by the new owners coming in in a few weeks.

Whenever Marcia or I had a project going outside or in the garage, Jerry would frequently wander over to see what is going on. Both of them pitched in with hours of help when Marcia mounted an art exhibit in Portland, IN, some 50 miles away. They were part of what made that so successful.

The two of them took care of Joyce’s mother and brother until both passed away. Their home was open door to family in need. Their loving went a long way.

We will deeply miss their presence here; already do. We wish them the very best with their move and settling into a new place; this to be an apartment near one daughter. We worry some about how this is going to work out for them. They have been used to a rather large home and a quiet neighborhood. And Jerry always like to putter in the yard and Joyce too; which has become more difficult for them over time.

We always felt we could count on them if need be and they could count on us. It was tough for Marcia and me to watch the UHaul truck loaded with their possessions and two cars depart today. It is likely we will never see them again in this lifetime. Pretty depressing and sad.

Gathering of Men

Fathers Day…. Many years ago, I attended what was called, “A Gathering of Men”. One exercise we participated in was to gather in groups of about 30 or so. We were asked to individually introduce ourselves by saying, “My name is xxxxxxx, the son of xxxxxx, and the grandson of XXXXXX”.

It was both a shock and astounding to me that well over half of the group did not know the name of their own grandfathers…… the men upon whose shoulders they stood.

I believe that on Fathers Day all of us should take a few minutes to honor our male ancestry however many generations we can go back and know about. Those generations live in each of us in our DNA. We can be grateful.

Hope you all have a wonderful and blessed Fathers Day.

Kent

Honoring Ancestors

Today I give thanks for the generations before mine — their valuable knowledge and wisdom from their vast life experiences. With deep appreciation, I offer these words of blessing: I honor you for the path you have walked and the perspective you share from your life’s journey. Your contributions to the world add lasting value beyond measure. Your sage words enrich the lives of all who listen. I give thanks for your memories and the stories you share.

You are a light of love in the world today. Your enthusiasm for life and the love you express inspire me to make a difference in the lives of others. Thank you for reminding me that I, too, always have something to give.

We speak God’s wisdom, secret and hidden, which God decreed before the ages for our glory — 1 Corinthians 2:7

[The above from a small publication I have subscribed to for decades. When down, always helps to lift me.]

Traitor Liz Cheney

Representative Liz Cheney
US House of Representatives
416 Cannon HOB
Washington DC 20515

Rep. Cheney:

I do not often write to Congressional members other than those representing my home state. You are an exception.

The Wyoming Republican Party threw you out. Obviously, you did not get the message. I suspect it will become clear soon and you will be out of Congress. It could not happen sooner.

I have been a Republican from the time I could first vote over 6 decades ago. I have been fooled several times in voting for traitors, crooks, and corrupt politicians. One of those times was for George W Bush and his comrade, Dick Cheney. You clearly want to follow in their footsteps. Won’t happen. The people ultimately will not allow that.  

You have no idea how angry folks in fly-over country are getting. They have had enough. The Biden administration must go, but not to be replaced by your wing of the GOP. That would be worse.

It may take some more time. I just hope the country will survive in the meanwhile. We must get rid of you and those of your ilk as well as traitorous Democrats. Frankly, I am a bit surprised that the citizens of Wyoming, whom you have betrayed, have not dragged you out of Congress via impeachment. But you will be out.

You should resign. You have done enough damage to our country.

America First.

Sincerely,

Kent H Blacklidge Ph.D.

On the Brink

Our country and the life we once lived has descended into twisting and turning darkness and chaos. No matter your values, beliefs, or political leanings; this is something universally agreed upon. Worldwide pandemic restrictions and consequences, corruption in all institutions we once relied upon to govern our world, runaway inflation, supply chain nightmares including baby formula shortages, federal agencies weaponizing surveillance powers, explosion of social media an cancel culture nightmares, the breakthrough discoveries of quantum physics, and technologies advancing at warp speed are just a few of the forces that impinge upon our psyches daily.

Our collective planetary nervous system has awakened — begun communicating and expressing itself. Yet some things remain largely intact. The birth of this nation and with it the unique concept people could live and flourish in individual freedom and self-governance lives on. To date, we are struggling but have not fallen.

Interestingly, massive changes in science, technology, and belief systems have placed in the hands of the common person one of the most powerful inventions to date: hand-held devices and the networks over which they transmit. Worldwide communities have sprung up connecting people by interests they share.

Our planet is immersed in a collective dark night of the soul. The outcome remains undetermined but there are a few variables we can count on.

First, we each have free will. The choices we make will create our personal future and greatly influence our collective fate. Second, with choice comes responsibility. As individuals, we must arm ourselves with awareness, knowledge, and formulate a belief system by which to guide our choices. We are born into this world alone, we are responsible for the read we crate through this world, and we will leave this world as we entered it: alone.

For myself, I choose to look to those who have come before for hope and guidance.

Chief Seattle 1854

“Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together.”

John 3:2

“The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness will not overcome it.”

[This was written by Marcia Blacklidge as a part of submission of her art creation for the Artists Alley in Kokomo, Indiana]

Women of the Year

The Gannett Company, a major US media company whose newspaper flagship is USA Today, has announced its choices for “Women of the Year”. There is only one issue. One of the “women” is a man, Dr. Rachael Levine. Dr. Levine is a four-star admiral in the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and serves as the Assistant Secretary for Health under President Joe Biden.

Rachael Levine was born on October 28, 1957, as Richard Levine. He was married to Martha Peaslee Levine in 1988 and divorced in 2013. Together, they had two children, the offspring of a man and a woman. This leaves no doubt that Richard, now Rachael, is male, not female.

In 2011, he decided to “transition” to a she. Biologically, this is not possible. A short lesson in biology is in order.

In human beings, there are only two genders: male and female. The genetics are fixed and do not lie. Our DNA make up is determined at one point in time, conception, and cannot be changed. This happens only once in a lifetime; at the instant of beginning.

DNA is packaged in each of us in structures called chromosomes. We each have 46 chromosomes, 23 from our mother and 23 from our father. The chromosomes that determine our gender, male or female, are named the “X” and “Y”. Female children have two “X” chromosomes and male children have one “X” and one “Y” chromosome. That’s it.

And, yes, there are genetic abnormalities where there are extra chromosomes, DNA deletions, and more. And the CDC reports that about 2/3rds of all conceptions end in spontaneous abortion due to genetic abnormalities and other problems.

The point of all of this is there is no such thing as a transgender male or female. The term itself is an oxymoron. Biology is fixed at conception. One can claim to be a woman or man at will, but this does not change biology.

A prime example is what we now see in women’s athletics. So-called transgender women have different bone and muscle structure than biological women. This has resulted in transgenders being dominate in athletics requiring strength and endurance. Why true women have not gone ballistic over transgender participation in traditional womens’ sports is a mystery.

Biological men or women can identify with, dress like, groom like, romance like, and behave like those of the opposite sex; but they can never biologically become the opposite sex. This is regardless of hormone treatments and/or surgical changes. Will not happen. Time to quit fooling ourselves. A man should not be among the “Women of the Year”. This is an insult to women.